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Landing Page Vs Homepage – The Difference & When To Use Each

Landing Page Vs Homepage - The Difference & When To Use Each


Confused about the difference between a homepage and a landing page?

We’ve got you covered!

Today you will learn:

  • What is a homepage?
  • What is a landing page?
  • Why you should use a landing page as your homepage.

Be warned: here at ClickFunnels, we have a controversial take on this topic!

What Is a Homepage?

The word “homepage” means the web page that people are directed to when they type your website address into their browsers.

For example:

Our homepage is the page that you see when you go to www.clickfunnels.com.

However, the word “homepage” can also be used to refer to a specific type of page, one that is most commonly used for homepages.

This type of page typically has:

  • A logo.
  • A navigation bar.
  • A relevant image.
  • A headline. 
  • A quick description of the product, service, or the website itself. 
  • A call to action.
  • Sales copy. 
  • A footer.

It serves as a central hub for your online business.

From there, the visitor can explore your website further, since the navigation bar provides links to the most important pages (e.g. “About”, “Features”, “Pricing”, etc.).

Our homepage at www.clickfunnels.com doesn’t fit this description, though. More on that later…

Homepage Examples

Let’s look at some examples of the homepages that follow the typical homepage template:

You will see that the key features of this type of homepage remain the same but there are also some differences depending on the business model.

Blog Homepage Example: Scott H. Young

Scott H. Young is a popular personal development blogger most known for his “MIT Challenge”project where he went through the 4-year MIT computer science curriculum in just one year of self-study.

He’s also the author of “Ultralearning”, a book about accelerated learning where he shares advice on how to accomplish such impressive feats.

Here’s the homepage of his website:

Ultralearning website homepage screenshot.

As you can see, it has:

  • A logo.
  • A navigation bar.
  • A headline.
  • A picture of Scott.
  • An image of his book.
  • A short description of his blog
  • A call to action.
  • An opt-in form.
  • “As Seen In” media badges.

There’s nothing below the fold, which is understandable, given that someone who lands on Scott’s homepage is likely to be interested in reading his blog, which they can do for free by heading to the “Recent” section or to the “Articles” section.

In other words, they don’t need much persuasion, since the content they want to read is free. A homepage like Scott’s can work well when that’s the case.

SaaS Homepage Example: ConvertKit

ConvertKit sells email marketing software that is designed with creators in mind.

Here’s their homepage:

Convertkit website homepage screenshot.

As you can see, it has:

  • A logo. 
  • A navigation bar.
  • A relevant animation.
  • A headline.
  • A quick description of the product.
  • Two calls to action.

But that’s not all.

When you scroll down, you see four customer testimonials.

The first one is from Eric who is a muralist and has a blog and a newsletter:

Convertkit homepage testimonial from a muralist.

Then there’s Glo who transitioned from being a travel blogger to helping women see their worth and build their own businesses:

Convertkit homepage testimonial from travel blogger and business owner.

Then there’s Deborah, a homesteader who raises goats, writes books about homesteading and sustainability, and sells online courses on keeping goats and making soap.

Convertkit homepage testimonial from a homesteader, bookwriter and online course seller.

Finally, there’s Barron, a style blogger, whose ebook on the topic allowed him to quit his job and work on his blog full-time.

Convertkit homepage testimonial from a style blogger and book writer.

Note how these customers are all so different but they have all used ConvertKit to grow their businesses.

This helps to reassure potential customers that they too can benefit from the company’s software.

Then, as you scroll down, you see a three-point explanation of how ConvertKit can help you:

Three point explanation diagram of how email marketing software can help you.

Below it, there’s a call to action:

Email marketing software, call to action example.

Then you see links to three helpful resources:

Email marketing software helpful resources.

Finally, there’s a footer, which features a slogan and links to various relevant pages.

Convertkit homepage footer with links to various relevant web pages.

As you can see, ConvertKit’s homepage is much longer than Scott H. Young’s homepage, presumably because choosing email marketing software is a big decision that requires a substantial amount of persuasion.

Ecommerce Homepage Example: Native

Native sells cruelty-free hygiene products with clean ingredients. The company is most known for its deodorants.

Here’s their homepage:

Ecommerce website homepage example.

As you can see, it has:

  • A logo. 
  • A navigation bar.
  • A relevant image. 
  • A headline.
  • A quick description of the products in the image.
  • A call to action.

There’s also the bar with shipping and returns information at the top of the page which is a common feature on ecommerce websites.

Then there are links to product pages:

Ecommerce website homepage links to products.

Below those links, you see a display of Native’s main selling points:

Ecommerce website homepage links to products, display of main selling points.

As you scroll down, you see featured products:

Ecommerce website homepage links to featured products.

Then there’s social proof in the form of customer reviews and favorable tweets:

Ecommerce website homepage links to social proof.

Right below there’s a call to action to learn more about Native’s subscription:

Ecommerce website homepage, call to action.

Then there is a call to action with an emphasis on protection against body odor:

Ecommerce website homepage, call to action with an emphasis on protection against body odor.

Below there’s the same call to action but with an emphasis on safe ingredients:

Ecommerce website homepage, call to action with an emphasis on safe ingredients.

Then there’s an explanation of the key ingredients in Native deodorants:

Ecommerce product explanation of key ingredients.

Below the ingredient list there’s a call to action encouraging you to follow Native on Instagram:

Ecommerce website homepage, call to action encouraging you to follow a blog.

Finally, there’s a footer, which features relevant links, an opt-in form with a call to action, and social media buttons.

Ecommerce website homepage footer with relevant links, , an opt-in form with a call to action, and social media buttons.

As you can see, Native’s homepage is similar in length to that of ConvertKit’s but the key difference is that as an ecommerce company they need to introduce the potential customer to their entire product range, not just one product.

When Should You Use a Homepage?

Honestly?

You probably shouldn’t use the type of homepage that we have just discussed at all.

Let’s make one thing clear:

We are not throwing shade on the businesses whose homepages we have used as examples.

Scott Young is a popular blogger, Nathan Barry had grown ConvertKit to $2.2 million in monthly recurring revenue, and Moiz Ali sold Native for $100 million in cash.

So there’s no doubt that you can build a successful business while using this type of homepage. But is it optimal?

We don’t think so.

Here’s why:

Homepages like that have too many distractions.

Getting someone into your sales funnel is hard enough as it is. So why make it even harder by presenting your website visitors with a bunch of links?

There’s a better way and we’ll show you what it is.

What Is a Landing Page?

A landing page is a page that is designed to get the visitor to take a specific action.

Usually, when people talk about landing pages, they mean pages that are meant to collect the visitors’ email addresses.

They can be divided into three general categories:

  • Squeeze pages. These are super short landing pages that typically feature a headline, a call to action, an opt-in form… And not much else. They are often used as pop-ups as opposed to separate web pages.
  • Medium-length landing pages. These are longer landing pages. In addition to a headline, a call to action, and an opt-in form they may also feature elements such as copy, social proof, a bio, etc. 
  • Long-form landing pages. These are landing pages that look like long-form sales pages. In addition to a headline, a call to action, and an opt-in form they typically feature a ton of copy and various types of social proof.

It’s worth noting that technically, a sales page is a type of landing page since it is designed to get the visitor to buy the product, but the term “landing page” is usually reserved for pages designed to collect emails.

Also, traditionally, one of the characteristics of landing pages was their lack of navigation, you had to either press the call-to-action button or press the “Back” button in your browser to leave a landing page.

However, now landing pages are often incorporated into the overall structure of the website, meaning that the navigation bar doesn’t disappear when you click through to a landing page from the homepage.

Landing Page Examples

Let’s take a look at three landing page examples:

Landing Page Example: “52 Headline Hacks”

Jon Morrow is a popular blogger and a world-renowned writing coach.

One of his lead magnets is an ebook called “52 Headline Hacks” which includes 52 headline formulas that have been proven to work well.

Take a look at its landing page:

52 Headline Hacks, book landing page example.

As you can see, it only features:

  • An image.
  • A headline.
  • A call-to-action button.
  • Privacy information.
  • Legal information link.

In other words…

This landing page is a typical squeeze page.

Landing Page Example: “Your First 10,000 Readers”

Nick Stephenson is a best-selling author and a business coach who teaches fellow writers how to market their books.

He offers free video training as a lead magnet.

Here’s what’s above the fold on its landing page:

Your First 10,000 Readers, book landing page example.

As you can see, in addition to the headline, copy, and a call to action button there’s also a video.

Below there’s social proof in the form of “Featured On” media badges:

Social proof in the form of “Featured On” media badges

Then there’s a breakdown of the free training:

Free training video screenshot example.

Below that there’s more social proof, this time in the form of testimonials from two bestselling authors:

Social proof in the form of testimonials from two bestselling authors with headshot photos.

Then there’s the final call to action:

Final call to action for free training.

And then there’s the footer at the bottom of the page.

Homepage footer with links to various relevant web pages.

This is a great example of a medium-length landing page that is longer than a squeeze page but shorter than a long-form landing page.

Landing Page Example: “DotCom Secrets”

Our co-founder, Russel Brunson, has written several books. We are giving them away as lead magnets.

Usually, when people use books as lead magnets, they give away digital copies but we are taking it to the next level by giving away physical ones.

All we are asking is that you cover the shipping cost ($9.95 within the U.S., $19.95 globally).

We believe in Russel’s message so we have gone the extra mile to show you how valuable these books are by creating long-form landing pages for them.

Let’s take a look at the “DotCom Secrets” landing page.

First, you have:

  • A logo.
  • A navigation bar.
  • A headline. 
  • A subheadline.
  • A video.
ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, landing page.

Then there’s a call to action that is supported by social proof:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, social proof with media badges.

Then there’s another headline and sub headline:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, headline and sub headline.

Then Russel:

  • Tells the ClickFunnels story.
  • Introduces the “DotCom Secrets” book.
  • Introduces the Two Comma Club Award.

Then there’s another call to action:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, with ClickFunnels story, introduction to the book and introduction to the two comma club.

Then Russel gets into details about what you can expect to learn from the book (he covers all four sections of the book one by one):

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, expectations of what you will learn from the book.

Then there’s another call to action:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, call to action.

Below it there’s a bunch of reader testimonials:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, numerous reader testimonials with videos.

Then there’s another call to action:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, call to action.

Then there’s a description of five free bonuses that you will get together with the book:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, description of five free bonuses that you will get together with the book.

It is followed by another call to action:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, call to action.

Then Russel:

  • Explains that the book is free, all he’s asking is for you to cover the shipping cost.
  • Reassures you that there’s no catch.
  • Explains his reasons for giving this book away for free.
  • Emphasizes that time is of the essence because there are only so many free book copies available. 
  • Offers a money-back guarantee and promises to refund the shipping cost if you don’t like the book.

Then there’s a summary of everything that is included in this offer that is followed by another call to action:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, summary of everything that is included in this offer that is followed by another call to action.

Below that there’s another reminder that the number of available free copies is limited:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, reminder that the number of available free copies is limited.

Then there’s a P.S. section:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, P.S. section.

Below the P.S. section there’s the final call to action:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, final call to action.

And then, at the very bottom of this landing page, there’s the footer:

ClickFunnels, DotCom Secrets, webpage footer with links to resources.

Wow, this is one long landing page… But guess what? It converts like crazy!

 Landing pages like that make sense when your lead magnet requires more commitment from the potential customer than they are accustomed to.

For example, people expect a free ebook version but we offer a free physical copy if they pay the shipping costs.

When Should You Use a Landing Page?

We believe that you should use landing pages throughout your entire sales funnel. What do we mean by that?

Russel Brunson has created a system for converting visitors into leads, leads into paying customers, and paying customers into repeat customers. It’s called the Value Ladder sales funnel.

Here’s how it looks like:

The value ladder diagram.

As you can see, it includes four offers:

  • A lead magnet (bait) that you give away for free in exchange for the potential customer’s email address.
  • A frontend offer that is your least valuable and least expensive product.
  • A middle offer that is a more valuable and more expensive product.
  • A backend offer that is your most valuable and most expensive product.

As the customer is progressing through this sales funnel, they are getting more and more value, so they are ascending a value ladder so to speak.

Landing pages are crucial at each of these four stages, starting from the first one, the bait or lead magnet stage.

Which brings us back to homepages…

Why You Should Use a Landing Page as Your Homepage

Your homepage should be a landing page.

It should be designed with one goal in mind:

To convert site visitors into leads.

That way, instead of distracting your visitors with a bunch of links, you intentionally guide them toward the first rung of your value ladder, the lead magnet.

Once they download that lead magnet, then you can think about selling them your product.

We know, you are eager to close the sale ASAP but believe us, the Value Ladder sales funnel is the best way to maximize your revenue.

So don’t jump straight into selling. Be patient and guide the visitors toward your lead magnet. You will make more money that way.

Landing Page as a Homepage Example: ClickFunnels

We walk the talk.

Here’s our homepage:

ClickFunnels landing page as your website homepage example.

As you can see, it’s not a typical homepage, it’s a landing page that is designed to get you to sign up for a free 14-day trial.

We explain the difference between a website and a sales funnel:

ClickFunnels website homepage explaining difference between a website and a sales funnel.

Then we explain what’s included in ClickFunnels software:

ClickFunnels website homepage explaining what is in ClickFunnels software.

Then we go into more detail about generating leads…

ClickFunnels website homepage explaining details about generating leads.

selling your products…

ClickFunnels website homepage explaining details about selling your products.

…and using follow-up funnels:

ClickFunnels website homepage explaining details about follow-up funnels.

Don’t know how to use sales funnels?

We have a quick survey that helps you find the best funnel for you depending on your business model:

ClickFunnels website homepage explaining details about using sales funnels.

Then there’s a 10-minute demo video in which Russel demonstrates how ClickFunnels software works by creating a sales funnel for Grant Cardone (for real!):

ClickFunnels website homepage 10-minute demo video with call to action.

Below it are links to landing pages with more detailed information about various ClickFunnel features.

Note that those pages are also designed to get you to sign up for our free 14-day trial, so these links aren’t distractions.

ClickFunnels call to action link design diagram.

Then there’s a call to action:

ClickFunnels website homepage call to action.

Below it there is a bunch of video testimonials followed by another call to action:

ClickFunnels website homepage video testimonials with a call to action.

Below that call to action there’s the Frequently Asked Questions section:

ClickFunnels website homepage frequently asked questions list.

Then there’s the final call to action:

ClickFunnels website homepage free trial call to action.

And below it there’s the footer:

ClickFunnels website homepage footer with various relevant links.

Conclusion

So now you know that you should use a landing page as your homepage. But that’s just the beginning.

You need to convert site visitors into leads, leads into paying customers, and paying customers into repeat customers.

Remember the Value Ladder sales funnel?

It’s what our founders Russel Brunson and Todd Dickerson used to grow ClickFunnels from zero to $10 million in annual revenue in just one year.

And then they used it to increase the company’s annual revenue to $100 million. Pretty cool, right?

Our 5 Day Challenge will show you how to implement sales funnels in your business.

You will learn how to:

  • Generate unlimited leads.
  • Create your first lead magnet.
  • Build your first sales funnel.
  • Create a simple 6-email follow-up sequence.
  • And launch your funnel!

…in just five days.

So don’t hesitate.

Join our 5 Day Challenge. It’s completely free!



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